• Works to please others
  • Optimistic and cooperative
  • Plans ahead

EAGLE CHARACTERISTICS

  • Likes tradition and rules
  • Tends to have good work habits
  • Image-conscious
  • Very aware of how everyone is behaving
  • Tends to be “clean cut”
  • Tries to live up to society’s expectations
  • Reads symbolic themes into things
  • Punctual
  • Tends to be organized, neat, and tidy
  • May ignore their mistakes unless they are brought up
ORGANIZED
TRADITIONAL
COOPERATIVE

EAGLE STRENGTHS

  • Works to please others
  • Optimistic and cooperative
  • Plans ahead

EAGLE STRUGGLES

  • May not recognize flaws
  • May judge others harshly
  • May be too focused on others

EAGLE INSPIRATIONS

  • Being seen as good and trustworthy
  • Planning ahead
  • Everyone doing their part
  • An organized and hardworking team

 

INTRODUCTION

The Eagle will often be perceived as a straight arrow and a rules follower. They practice this ideal by being very organized and showing other similar behaviors like planning and attention to detail.

The Eagle believes that there is a proper time and place for everything. They like things to run on schedule. The Eagle is image-conscious. As an athlete, they proudly display their trophies and ribbons. This type is motivated to earn recognition awards.

EFFECTS OF DEFINING TRAITS

One effect of these traits found in the Eagle is that they are capable of getting a good deal of work done. They know how to work effectively.

The Eagle might even be a good example for others to emulate. This is because the Eagle typically follows rules, they care about their reputation, and seldom do they try to cross the line or push the envelope. The Eagle strives to have an ordered lifestyle.

Finally, the Eagle is reluctant to admit to a mistake or fault.

DURING ATHLETIC COMPETITION

Eagle traits typically have more impact on the team at practice and during the off-season than during competition. Most Eagles are able to bounce back from a mistake rather quickly when competing– they are capable of moving on to the next play or match.

The Eagle is able to make adjustments during competition. For example, an Eagle who plays basketball is able to make halftime adjustments. The coach can change the role or position of an Eagle athlete during competition.

HELPING THE EAGLE

Much learning that occurs in sports is by trial and error. The error part means that mistakes will happen at practice and during competition. First, the individual must recognize that a mistake has been made. Then, they must figure out what caused the mistake and how to work to remedy the situation.

The Eagle needs help taking ownership of a mistake. Without complete ownership, the learning process will be impeded. The Eagle is confident enough that the coach can push them. The typical Eagle probably needs this because there is a slight tendency to settle for mediocrity, the Eagle needs to be challenged in order to reach their potential.

Finally, the Eagle feels more comfortable with coaches and programs that are organized and operate smoothly like a “well-oiled machine”.

PROMINENT PRO ATHLETE EAGLES

Peyton Manning, football
Russell Wilson, football
Jimmy Garoppolo, football
Derek Carr, football
Deshaun Watson, football
J.J. Watt, football
Evan Fournier, basketball
Mike Trout, baseball
Madison Bumgarner, baseball
Kyle Schwarber, baseball
Noah Syndergaard, baseball
Corey Seager, baseball
Casey Mitelstadt, hockey
Joel White, lacrosse
Cecil Afrika, rugby
Theunis De Bruyn, cricket
Jailyn Ford, softball
Cat Osterman, softball

EAGLE TIPS

GUIDANCE FOR COMMON SITUATIONS IN ATHLETICS AND LIFE

EAGLE ATHLETES PARENTING THE EAGLE COACHING THE EAGLE

TIPS FOR EAGLE ATHLETES

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

KEY TENDENCY

Do not expect people to live up to the same standards you abide by, even though you wish they would.

DEALING WITH PRAISE

You do not generally need a lot of praise. Take the time to appreciate when others notice your effort on the details and think back on that praise you need a reminder.

DEALING WITH CRITICISM

Don’t beat yourself up if you’ve made a mistake. Instead, simply realize the mistake was at least partly your fault and move on. Remember that mistakes are learning opportunities to make you better.

RELATING TO OTHERS

You expect things to happen in a certain order and in a certain way, but try not let it bother you if things end up going differently than you thought it would.

TAKING INSTRUCTIONS

As an Eagle, you generally enjoy learning the details and facts about things such as the playbook or scouting reports. Use this skill to be an asset to your teammates and coaches. You should use it during both practice and competition.

MOTIVATION

You tend to work hardest when coaches or parents are watching– try to expand that behavior to when they are not watching in order to maximize your efforts.

AFTER A SETBACK

After a setback, you should seek out those who are great positive reinforcers to help you focus on your best efforts.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

You need plenty of time to plan and organize for practice and otherwise prepare for competition. Be sure you set aside enough time to adequately prepare up to your standards. If this is not possible in certain situations, focus on the top priorities and do not worry about the minor details.

HELPING OTHERS

Use your organization skills and try to rub off on others. Help teammates be on time or prepare for practices, games, etc.

CAUTION

It is best if Eagles do not dwell on unfortunate things that may have happened in the past. Better yet, Eagles should just let them go and be true to their natural optimism: What happened in the past does not equal the future.

PARENTING THE EAGLE

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE PARENTING STYLE

The most effective communication style between you and your Eagle is to drive to the core issue.

HOW TO PRAISE

Your approval is reward enough for an Eagle. Generously mention it when you approve or are happy with their behavior.

HOW TO CRITICISE

Never make a sports mistake seem like it is morally wrong. Also, do not talk badly about the coach or other teammates to an Eagle because they will feel like they need to take sides.

HOW TO RELATE

Eagles will respect you. You don’t have to ‘pull rank’ with them. Whenever possible with your Eagle, try to relate as one adult to the other.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Use the cookbook method and break it down into steps.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Your opinion carries a lot of weight because Eagles will strive to please their parents. Make sure they strive towards their own goals instead of yours.

AFTER A SETBACK

Communicate a plan that has clear steps, on how you will help them get through their setback. It’s important to stay positive and supportive.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Pre-competition rituals and the like are important to your Eagle. For example, they will want their equipment & uniform clean and ready far in advance of competition.

WHAT TO ENCOURAGE

Reinforce that substance is more important than style.

WHAT TO CAUTION

Don’t neglect praising the Eagle, because they try hard to please others, especially parents. Remember to fill their emotional tank periodically with praise for doing well, especially for something like following rules or a regimen.

COACHING THE EAGLE

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE COACHING STYLE

Eagles expect the coach to set an example of hard work and attention to detail. They probably like a coach who is fairly clean cut, traditional, and especially one that is organized.

HOW TO PRAISE

You do not need to constantly praise an Eagle, but noticing some little thing they did correctly scores big points with them.

HOW TO CRITICISE

This is important: Ask an Eagle what they did wrong, and get them to take ownership of their mistake– but don’t rub their nose in it.

HOW TO RELATE

Eagles should relate to power, things like title or rank. They think appearances are important, like dressing up on game day. They like rules that are tied to the philosophy and culture of the program.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Go step by step, in logical progression, in other words, use the cookbook method.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Eagles care what others think about them in terms of things like their reputation, legacy, etc. Use that to motivate them.

AFTER A SETBACK

Remind Eagles of the mission and process. They find security knowing the coach will stay the course, so stay positive and supportive.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Eagles will want all the details filled in. They prefer the same practice schedule, and do not particularly need variety.

ENCOURAGE AND DEVELOP

Reinforce to your Eagle(s) that substance is more important than style.

WHAT TO DEVELOP

Try and help sharpen their ability to be better at “going with the flow”, and being more flexible when appropriate.