• Sets and focuses on goals
  • Pushes self hard
  • Admits faults

ICE CHARACTERISTICS

  • They strive to improve and never stop working
  • Will set high standards for themselves
  • Admits faults and mistakes
  • May be self critical
  • Often competitive and hates losing
  • They tend to push themselves
  • Works hard in the off-season
  • Typically has serious long term goals
  • May seem distant to those they are not close to
  • Faces reality and expects the same of others
COMPETITIVE
GRINDER
GOAL-ORIENTED

ICE STRENGTHS

  • Sets and focuses on goals
  • Pushes self hard
  • Admits faults

ICE STRUGGLES

  • May be reluctant to change their plan
  • Could put too much pressure on themselves
  • May fail to communicate

ICE INSPIRATIONS

  • Developing themselves
  • Overcoming adversity
  • Enjoys a tough challenge
  • Surpassing previous records or bests

INTRODUCTION

Ice athletes have two defining traits that go hand in hand: they are goal driven and also self-critical. This means that they can be relentless in pursuing a personal goal while using small to moderate failure or adversity as motivation to persevere. In extreme cases of adversity, it is very hard for them to bounce back from a mistake or setback.

EFFECTS OF DEFINING TRAITS

This type is an asset to teams and organizations that are traditionally strong. This is because they tend to question the status quo and will push to continue to improve rather than coasting or being complacent.

In some ways this type is hard to recognize because many of their traits are average, with a wide variation. For instance, some Ice types can be quiet while others are outgoing. However, all Ice types have a strong desire to change and improve.

They like to stretch the boundaries of normal attainment while seeking meaning and symbolism in realistic kinds of ways. For example: if a classmate was in a severe car wreck, they may use it as inspiration to be better at what they do.

DURING ATHLETIC COMPETITION

To some extent, this type expects competition to go as scripted in the game plan, they’re average at spontaneous improvisation. Their self-critical trait will show during competition, specifically after mistakes. They might shake their head or put their hands on their hips. The typical Ice athlete is motivated to make adjustments during competition.

HELPING THE ICE

This type would benefit a great deal from learning relaxation techniques along with Cognitive Restructuring or Rational Emotive Therapy. This will help them with how they appraise and label the events going on in their lives, like recieving an F on a term paper and being able to see it as unfavorable rather than a matter of life and death. An Ice athlete needs some help in calibrating these kinds of extreme events so that they react appropriately. The tendency to be self-critical is very similar to seeing the glass as half empty. During competition, the Ice may dwell too long on a mistake.

From the sidelines coaches, parents and others can point out something positive that happened on the last play and offer encouragement along with a phrase that will help the athlete refocus and reset for the next play. For instance: “Way to hustle; we’ll get it done this time around.” The same applies to practice and even off-season conditioning. The best way to help an Ice is to continue to be upbeat and positive. The Ice tends to overlook and under-appreciate changes that are positive.

PROMINENT PRO ICE ATHLETES

Matt Ryan, football
Rob Gronkowski, football
Julian Edelman, football
Jordy Nelson, football
Aaron Judge, baseball
Chris Sale, baseball
Jon Lester, baseball
Dexter Fowler, baseball
PT Ricci, lacrosse
Rudy Second, cricket
Alexander Coetzee, shooting
Maryka Holtzhausen, netball
Ashley Hansen Church, softball

ICE TIPS

GUIDANCE FOR COMMON SITUATIONS IN ATHLETICS AND LIFE

ICE ATHLETES PARENTING THE ICE COACHING THE ICE

TIPS FOR ICE ATHLETES

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

KEY TENDENCY

You may be like the majority of Ice athletes– seeing the glass as half empty more so than half full, try to be more optimistic during competition.

DEALING WITH PRAISE

Stop and enjoy it, you are receiving praise because you earned it!

DEALING WITH CRITICISM

When you internalize criticism, it makes you feel bad. Don’t think a mistake makes you a worthless person because everyone makes mistakes.

RELATING TO OTHERS

You relate to tangible goals and outcomes. Writing out your goals for practice, games and seasons would be productive.

TAKING INSTRUCTIONS

When receiving instruction, focus on understanding how it fits into the larger picture and how the process works.

MOTIVATION

Set a goal. Develop a plan with steps and deadlines, then keep a daily journal which you can revise as needed.

AFTER A SETBACK

Give yourself time to work through the setback and lean on your support system, like your family, teammates, coaches and others.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Try using mental practice and taking mental reps. Picture yourself winning and executing correctly.

HELPING OTHERS

Most others are not as competitive as you, help motivate them to compete at a higher level when needed.

CAUTION

Your desire to win and succeed is strong but this places a lot of pressure on you emotionally. You likely have a hard time being truly satisfied or content. It would be best if you would remember to stop and smell the roses occasionally– try seeing the glass as half full.

PARENTING THE ICE

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE PARENTING STYLE

Your Ice athlete prefers honesty, don’t sugarcoat things with them or for them, and keep things direct.

HOW TO PRAISE

Praise both the Ice’s ability and effort. Point out when progress is being made. They may need to celebrate victory more because they more naturally feel a sense of relief, not sheer joy, after victory or success.

HOW TO CRITICISE

Go easy on the Ice. They are often their own harshest critic.

HOW TO RELATE

Ice athletes will feel strongly about certain values they hold in high esteem, you should use those to relate to them better.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Teach your Ice athlete that it’s about the journey too, not just the destination.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Ice athletes strive to better themselves. The need for achievement is high and failure is taken personally, as if they lack worth.

AFTER A SETBACK

Ice won’t give up but will be upset with themself and their confidence will be somewhat diminished.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Ice usually work hard to be prepared. During pregame, make sure they focus on the positive, not dwell on the negatives, which will cause them to worry.

WHAT TO ENCOURAGE

Your Ice athlete may tend to bottle up their emotions. Try to let them to open up when something is bothering them and talk it through gently and logically with them.

WHAT TO CAUTION

Big games or important events will add even more pressure to the Ice, in these situations try to keep things light.

COACHING THE ICE

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE COACHING STYLE

Be direct with the Ice type. They do not need you to be warm and fuzzy, keep it professional.

HOW TO PRAISE

Praise the Ice athletes on your team when they are making progress– they tend to overlook or minimize this.

HOW TO CRITICISE

With Ice athletes, focus on the behavior you are trying to correct, don’t make it personal, just tell them the facts.

HOW TO RELATE

Ice do a lot of internal thinking. Get them to open up and talk about things by asking them a question and providing them lots of time to answer.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Teach Ice how to see situations appropriately. Give them time alone to process new things.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Make goals realistic, immediate and in the Ice’s control instead of goals that are more outcome focused.

AFTER A SETBACK

Ice will often blame themself and may let a mistake continue to haunt them as the competition progresses. Provide enough space for them to think and then prompt them to share their thoughts.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

The Ice athletes on your team will prepare for the worst. While this can be good, they need to practice being proactive and going on the attack.

ENCOURAGE AND DEVELOP

Attempt to have the Ice athlete try new things through different approaches to their sport.

WHAT TO DEVELOP

Work with Ice types to better handle frustration and strong emotions effectively.