• Listens before talking
  • Tries hard to avoid mistakes
  • Respects the coach and mentors

KNIGHT CHARACTERISTICS

  • Very protective of close friends and family
  • Has a strong but hidden value system
  • Becomes upset when their values are compromised
  • Great listener
  • More focused on their teammates and specific team members than winning
  • Naturally tends to internally process and consider things
  • May appear uninterested in socializing or being around a lot of people
  • Often surprised when others don’t see them as social
  • Tend to clam up when upset
  • Often great with pets and animals
  • Needs extra time with their few close friends/family
RESPECT
VALUES
LISTENS

KNIGHT STRENGTHS

  • Listens before talking
  • Tries hard to avoid making mistakes
  • Respects the coach and mentors

KNIGHT STRUGGLES

  • May let criticism hurt their feelings
  • Could have trouble dealing with team conflict
  • Sometimes will not open up and say what’s bothering them

KNIGHT INSPIRATIONS

  • Establishing their own values
  • Praise from those they respect
  • Respect given for individual needs
  • The team comes together supporting each other

INTRODUCTION

This type is not as interested in socializing, being in crowded public places, and meeting new faces as other types. Yet at the same time, social cohesion is highly important to Knights– they want to spend time with close friends and family.

Possibly the strongest defining trait is that rules are important to the Knight. Things like principles are strongly held and there’s not much give in their belief system. The typical Knight tends to be a deep thinker, and others may see them as introverted or burdened. This perception is only partly true, but there is a tendency for the Knight to read too much into what people say and do.

EFFECTS OF DEFINING TRAITS

Knights expect other people to follow rules. They also expect authority figures to enforce rules. Because the social needs of the Knight are complex, others may feel that they are hard to get to know and even send mixed signals. Yet, once one becomes close with a Knight they will notice some warmth.

The Knight desires harmony in the relationships they form. Because of the Knight’s emotional makeup, they tend to clam up when upset. It’s not easy to get them to talk about things that make them upset.

DURING ATHLETIC COMPETITION

The Knight’s traits have more impact in the off-season and practice than during competition. For instance, how teammates relate to one another and practice in the off-season can have an impact on the Knight’s overall feeling about the upcoming season and program.

The typical Knight has a pregame ritual which involves quiet time, usually away from others, or is engaged in something like closing their eyes and listening to music on their headphones and shutting off the outside world. They tend to be more focused on technique and body position than on the actions of the opponent.

HELPING THE KNIGHT

The first thing the coach, teacher, or mentor must do in order to help the Knight is to earn their trust. This is done primarily by following rules, processes, and procedures. The Knight has a difficult time relating to a coach who tries to be friends with their players and runs a loose program. The Knight needs help dealing with ambiguity, uncertainty and gray areas– the Knight is too quick to judge something as good or bad. Point out that some situations are ambivalent – have both positive and negative elements.

The Knight also has difficulty dealing with what is called avoidance – avoidance conflict, this is a situation when two things need to be done but both are unpleasant. The Knight has difficulty coming up with a plan and prioritizing things in this kind of situation. There is a slight tendency for the Knight to feel like they are a martyr.

While it is not advised that you encourage a feeling of “misery loves company”, it might help to point out that the Knight is not the only one who has to face adversity. There is not one single method that will work with every Knight but the Knight needs help opening up and talking about what is bothering them. At the very least, touch base each day with the Knight and ask them how things are going.

PROMINENT PRO ATHLETE KNIGHTS

Marcus Mariota, football
Kirk Cousins, football
Teddy Bridgewater, football
Le’Veon Bell, football
Dez Bryant, football
Jamal Adams, football
Draymond Green, basketball
Giancarlo Stanton, baseball
Manny Machado, baseball
Francisco Lindor, baseball
Will Manny, lacrosse
Tommy Kelly, lacrosse
Oupa Mohoje, rugby
Franco Smith, rugby
Dave Miller, cricket
Tanya Mostert, netball

KNIGHT TIPS

GUIDANCE FOR COMMON SITUATIONS IN ATHLETICS AND LIFE

KNIGHT ATHLETES PARENTING THE KNIGHT COACHING THE KNIGHT

TIPS FOR KNIGHT ATHLETES

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

KEY TENDENCY

You care quite a bit about your reputation, including what parents, coaches and teachers think and say about you. Try not to let those feelings become too powerful during competition and just play the game naturally.

DEALING WITH PRAISE

Your response is pretty typical: you like praise but don’t need it constantly. When you receive praise, listen for a hidden lesson that you can use to help you in the future.

DEALING WITH CRITICISM

You probably don’t love criticism but you can handle it fairly well. Just remember to take it in stride and move on.

RELATING TO OTHERS

You identify with people like police officers, judges, and even referees. You believe if someone makes a rule, then it needs to be followed, or don’t make the rule in the first place. Not everyone feels that way though, so think of other ways to relate to them.

TAKING INSTRUCTIONS

Since you have a tendency to stay quiet, speak up if you don’t understand or need clarification, especially when receiving instruction. Think of the old saying, there is no such thing as a dumb question.

MOTIVATION

Find someone on the team to connect with to be your friend and be mutually supportive. Have that teammate challenge you with a big goal.

AFTER A SETBACK

You can live with the consequences and move on but you do not want everyone making a big deal about your setbacks, especially publicly.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

You probably want to be alone right before the start of competition. You’re not the type who pounds on lockers and screams right before it is game time. If you cannot be alone, maybe try headphones with music.

HELPING OTHERS

Use your strong listening skills to help others talk through their challenges. Also, protect your friends and teammates from being taken advantage of by others.

CAUTION

Knights care deeply about following the rules, but you should try not to worry about all the technicalities. There is a good chance you do not want to be everyone’s friend on your team, nevertheless you should work on being a good teammate to all. You should also allow yourself some privacy when needed and at least a few minutes alone each day to reflect or just unwind.

PARENTING THE KNIGHT

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE PARENTING STYLE

Practice what you preach. If not, you’ll lose a great deal of credibility with your Knight.

HOW TO PRAISE

Praise is okay for a Knight, but they will feel uncomfortable if you brag about their accomplishments to others.

HOW TO CRITICISE

You can be fairly harsh with your Knight– but most Knights embarrass easily so the less public, the better.

HOW TO RELATE

Knights relate to rules and things like the natural laws of physics. They often seeks quiet time or time alone — allowing them this time is another way to relate to them.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Teach your Knight to worry less about what other people think– especially what others think about them.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

If you set the bar high, a Knight will strive to reach it. However, they will benefit from you monitoring their progress.

AFTER A SETBACK

Knights will stay the course but won’t ask for help, if you think they need help it’s best if you offer it to them without them having to approach you for it.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Knights prefer a set plan, and they will run the play just like it is in the playbook.

WHAT TO ENCOURAGE

Knights sees things as black and white, it is important that you help them deal with those gray areas in life.

WHAT TO CAUTION

Watch out when dealing with situations and others that are in conflict with your Knight’s values.

COACHING THE KNIGHT

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE COACHING STYLE

In coaching a Knight, be genuine and sincere. They probably prefer a friendly approach but most importantly, Knights like a coach who can see them as being unique or special instead of just one of the rank and file.

HOW TO PRAISE

Praise a Knight privately or quietly as they often get embarrassed easily– don’t make it a big deal publicly.

HOW TO CRITICISE

Knights are already hard on themselves, so you can be brief with criticism and know you have their full attention and that the message is being received.

HOW TO RELATE

Knights relate to people based on a set of values. Ask them what is important to them and learn what these values are. Then show them how they are connected to the team and their teammates through shared values.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

Tie the information to some principle, like a law of physics, or how this new information fits with something they already know. Knights also like “if X, then Y” logic or step-by-step instruction.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Knights prefer individual goals over team or group goals. They want to hear the plan for achieving their goal, and most Knights will need a push.

AFTER A SETBACK

Knights will often clam up after a setback. Give them some room initially, but then get them to talk through it.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Many Knights want to practice things they are already good at instead of working on areas that are weaker, so try to push them to practice and sharpen their weaknesses.

ENCOURAGE AND DEVELOP

Encourage a Knight to utilize their support group to get things off their chest, make sure they know it is not good to keep things bottled up.

WHAT TO DEVELOP

Try to help a Knight work on their communication skills, especially with strangers.