• Has a strong desire to help others
  • Listens well
  • Considers choices thoughtfully

MUSKETEER CHARACTERISTICS

  • Loyal
  • True to self and others
  • Doesn’t usually rock the boat
  • Has and uses common sense
  • Greater focus on the team than on winning
  • Doesn’t need to be the star
  • Easy to talk to
  • May easily get caught up in helping others
  • Prefers to consider before talking
TEAM-ORIENTED
HELPFUL
LOYAL

MUSKETEER STRENGTHS

  • Has a strong desire to help others
  • Listens well
  • Considers choices thoughtfully

MUSKETEER STRUGGLES

  • Could get taken advantage of by others
  • Sometimes has a hard time saying ‘no’ to others
  • May not be focused enough on winning

MUSKETEER INSPIRATIONS

  • Forming a strong bond
  • Everyone being authentic
  • Belonging to a close group
  • Helping the team succeed

INTRODUCTION

Musketeers tend to be fair, honest, and truthful. For the most part, they are straightforward and serious. Musketeers will freely admit faults and mistakes. The Musketeer is willing to lend a helping hand.

Musketeers can be either outgoing or quiet, but their willingness to help others and form a close bond is their core characteristic. Finally, Musketeers tend to be thoughtful. They seldom jump to conclusions when making decisions or sizing up other people.

EFFECTS OF DEFINING TRAITS

Musketeers are attracted to team sports, and some Musketeers may be on the quiet side but they enjoy feeling as if they belong and part of the team. They seldom judge other people, and are tolerant and open-minded.

Others will probably see them as down to earth, modest and humble, not flamboyant. Musketeers want plenty of time when making decisions, in fact, they grow uncomfortable when others try to rush them. Musketeers are interested in other people and also things of a practical nature. Most people will feel like it is easy to relate to a Musketeer.

One caution: some people will feel that a Musketeer is an easy target that they can take advantage of.

DURING ATHLETIC COMPETITION

When a Musketeer makes a mistake during competition, they are willing to recognize it unlike other types that may try to make excuses or fail to see what caused the mistake. This should help a Musketeer make modifications during competition so that the mistake is not repeated.

Musketeers tend to be cautious when making decisions, as they try extra hard to avoid mistakes. However, this can lead to hesitation, even making the Musketeer look tenuous or timid at times. Musketeers with low confidence feel badly when they make a mistake, feeling as if they let the team down. If this happens, they will become even more hesitant.

HELPING THE MUSKETEER

The sport and position of the Musketeer should be analyzed and situations should be identified when the Musketeer needs to be quicker at reaching a decision. The Musketeer should not practice skills at half-speed. Make sure their practice repetitions are done at full-speed.

Skilled Musketeers can be an asset to the coach– they are naturals in terms of peer-coaching because they enjoy helping and mentoring their teammates. This can be an effective way to motivate and reward the Musketeer, and the coach gets the added bonus of peer instruction.

While their willingness to admit a mistake is regarded as a positive Musketeer trait, this could be a problem if this tendency becomes extreme. In other words, the Musketeer may claim the mistake was their fault when in reality there are other contributing factors. For instance, a Musketeer QB may be reluctant to recognize that the botched snap exchange is really the fault of the center.

Finally, encourage and help Musketeers to learn techniques to get over mistakes quickly as this will greatly help them during competition.

PROMINENT PRO ATHLETE MUSKETEERS

Drew Brees, football
Alex Smith, football
Von Miller, football
Amari Cooper, football
Clay Matthews, football
Mike Moustakas, baseball
Andrew McCutchen, baseball
George Springer, baseball
Owen Tippett, hockey
Chris Bocklet, lacrosse
Pat Harbeson, lacrosse
Shaun Venter, rugby

MUSKETEER TIPS

GUIDANCE FOR COMMON SITUATIONS IN ATHLETICS AND LIFE

MUSKETEER ATHLETES PARENTING THE MUSKETEER COACHING THE MUSKETEER

TIPS FOR MUSKETEER ATHLETES

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

KEY TENDENCY

Your helpful attitude can really assist teammates and coaches. However, try not to be too overbearing about it.

DEALING WITH PRAISE

Your first instinct will be to defer praise to your teammates or coach, learning that it’s okay to accept praise personally will go a long way for you.

DEALING WITH CRITICISM

It is best for you to focus on what you did wrong and how to correct it next time. Try not to focus what others (especially teammates) think. If you focus on thinking you let others down, criticism will be harder to swallow.

RELATING TO OTHERS

You have common sense and are also a deep thinker. This means you often need time to think things through– make sure you give yourself that time when needed.

TAKING INSTRUCTIONS

When receiving individual instruction, take time later to mentally review and also consider how your individual contribution can help the team.

MOTIVATION

Consider how great winning will feel for the team. Focus on how you can help the team succeed.

AFTER A SETBACK

Try not to overreact to the situation by being too conservative or overly cautious, do not change your attitude if something goes wrong.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Be sure to focus on your individual needs (as well as the needs of the team) when practicing and preparing for competition.

HELPING OTHERS

When teammates make a mistake or are otherwise down, step in and help them bounce back.

CAUTION

You should focus on making a good play or creating a win rather than avoiding a mistake or a loss. Using positive imagery in order to do this can work.

PARENTING THE MUSKETEER

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE PARENTING STYLE

Musketeers do not need to be the center of attention. In fact, they might prefer it when the focus is on the group or team instead.

HOW TO PRAISE

Praise your Musketeer individually whenever appropriate, as their first instinct will be to defer the praise to their teammates.

HOW TO CRITICISE

Start with what part the Musketeer did right, then present the corrective action as a way to help them and tell them how the correction will help others on the team.

HOW TO RELATE

Use a common sense approach and relate to the present to reach your Musketeer.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

When instructing your Musketeer, describe how the instruction will help others too.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Musketeers want to feel like they contributed to the success of the team– this is what drives them.

AFTER A SETBACK

After a setback, give your Musketeer some personal time– especially with supportive friends or family.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Make sure the Musketeer practices at full speed.

WHAT TO ENCOURAGE

Musketeers enjoy social activities and want to help others, they will thrive when playing team sports and being involved in the community.

WHAT TO CAUTION

A Musketeer’s friendly, helpful disposition makes them a target for being taken advantage of by others.

COACHING THE MUSKETEER

HOW YOU CAN BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN COMMON SITUATIONS

MOST EFFECTIVE COACHING STYLE

Musketeers want to know that their coach has their back. Musketeers also want warmth, more so than just a lot of interaction.

HOW TO PRAISE

The best praise for a Musketeer is expressing how their effort and performance helped the whole team.

HOW TO CRITICISE

Start with what part the Musketeer did right, then present the corrective action as a way to help them and how the correction will help others on the team.

HOW TO RELATE

Musketeers relates to the right-now, the present. They relate to helping others, so when talking, they want the straight-up truth.

HOW TO INSTRUCT

If possible, give the Musketeer time to think things through and how the instruction you’ve given them helps the team.

MOTIVATION AND GOALS

Musketeers need a bit of a push frequently, make sure to explain how this makes everyone better–this will motivate them.

AFTER A SETBACK

Musketeers will accept help, and will try to help others experiencing a setback.

PRACTICE AND PREPARATION

Musketeers like being a peer coach, mentoring other players. Give them extra responsibilities during practice.

ENCOURAGE AND DEVELOP

Musketeers should focus more on individual performance and maybe even take more chances in competition. They will be at their best when they trusts their own instincts– however, this does not come naturally.

WHAT TO DEVELOP

More competitiveness will help the Musketeer.